23 Best Foods That Are High in Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

Vitamin B1, scientifically known as Thiamin, is a crucial member of the B-vitamin family, playing a pivotal role in maintaining our overall health.

This water-soluble vitamin is essential for converting the food we eat into energy, supporting proper nerve function, and aiding in the metabolism of carbohydrates.

While Thiamin deficiency is relatively rare in well-balanced diets, it’s essential to ensure you’re getting enough of this vital nutrient.

In this article, we will explore the top 23 foods that are rich in Vitamin B1, making them excellent additions to your diet.

Whether you’re looking to bolster your energy levels, enhance your nerve function, or simply maintain optimal health, these Thiamin-packed foods will provide the nutrition your body needs.

Let’s delve into the world of Vitamin B1 and discover which foods you should include in your daily meals for a healthier, more energetic you.

The Importance of Vitamin B1 in The Human Body

Before we dive into the list, let’s take a moment to understand what Vitamin B1, or Thiamin, is and why it’s important.

The human body is an incredible machine, requiring a variety of essential nutrients to function optimally.

One of the vital players that silently but effectively works to ensure our health is Vitamin B1, also known as Thiamin.

Thiamin performs countless functions, particularly related to energy production and cognitive function.

It plays a critical role in converting the food we consume, carbohydrates in particular, into energy.

This keeps our muscle cells active and healthy.

Vitamin B1 is also necessary for proper brain function. It participates in the creation of neurotransmitters – the brain’s chemicals that communicate between cells.

This underlines its vital role in maintaining a robust cognitive health that includes memory strength and mental clarity.

To put it in a nutshell, Thiamin is the ‘everyday superhero’ necessary for our bodies to function at their highest possible capacity.

We may tend to overlook thiamin in our daily nutrition, yet its absence can disrupt our body’s harmony.

Ensuring a diet rich in thiamin can bring about significant benefits for our overall wellness.

So, why not take a step towards health by incorporating some thiamin-packed foods into our meals?

Top 23 Foods High In Thiamin (Vitamin B1)

vitamin b1 (thiamine) foods
vitamin b1 (thiamine) foods

1. Rainbow Trout

Rainbow trout is a nutrient-dense fish that offers several health benefits. It is rich in B vitamins, especially vitamin B12 and niacin. Vitamin B12 is essential for nerve function and the production of red blood cells, while niacin supports energy metabolism and healthy skin.

Additionally, rainbow trout is a good source of thiamin, providing 10% of the daily value in a three-ounce (85-gram) serving of cooked trout.

Thiamin is vital for converting food into energy and maintaining proper heart and nerve function. Including rainbow trout in your diet can help fulfill your B vitamin requirements and support overall health.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 fillet (71 g)Thiamin per 3-oz (85g) serving
0.143 mg (12% DV)0.102 mg (9% DV)0.122 mg (10% DV)

2. Salmon

Salmon is not only a delicious fish but also a nutritional powerhouse. With a three-ounce serving of cooked farmed Atlantic salmon, you can get 24% of the daily value for thiamin.

Additionally, salmon is abundant in choline, a nutrient that supports brain health and metabolism.

Packed with essential nutrients, salmon is an excellent choice to incorporate into a balanced diet.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 0.5 fillet (178 g)Thiamin per 3-oz (85g) serving
0.34 mg (28% DV)0.605 mg (50% DV)0.289 mg (24% DV)

3. Mussels

Mussels, known for their delectable taste and distinct flavor, are not only a culinary delight but also a nutritional powerhouse.

These small shellfish are an excellent choice for those seeking nutrient-rich seafood options.

With high levels of thiamin, a cup serving of mussels provides an impressive 38% of the daily value.

Indulging in mussels not only satisfies the taste buds but also ensures a good dose of essential nutrients for a healthier lifestyle.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 cup, cooked (150 g)
0.303 mg (25% DV)0.455 mg (38% DV)

4. Bluefin Tuna

Bluefin tuna is a highly nutritious oily fish that is packed with essential nutrients.

One notable nutrient it provides is thiamin, which is crucial for maintaining a healthy nervous system and aiding in energy production.

Consuming a three-ounce serving of cooked bluefin tuna offers 20% of the recommended daily value for thiamin.

With its delicious taste and abundant health benefits, bluefin tuna is a fantastic addition to any balanced diet.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 3-oz (85g) serving
0.278 mg (23% DV)0.236 mg (20% DV)

5. Chicken Liver

Chicken liver is a nutrient-rich food that provides substantial amounts of essential vitamins.

It is particularly known for its high content of vitamin B5, B12, and all B vitamins.

Additionally, a serving of three ounces (85 grams) of cooked chicken liver offers 21% of the recommended daily value of thiamin.

With its impressive nutritional profile, chicken liver is a valuable addition to a balanced diet.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 3-oz (85g) serving
0.289 mg (24% DV)0.246 mg (21% DV)

6. Wheat Germ

Wheat Germ is the reproductive and growth-promoting part of a cereal grain.

It is highly nutritious, being the most nutrient-dense component of wheat.

Just one ounce (28 grams) of toasted wheat germ contains a significant 39% of the daily value of thiamin.

This makes wheat germ a valuable source of this essential nutrient, which plays a crucial role in maintaining a healthy nervous system and aiding in energy production.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 oz (28g) servingThiamin per 1 cup (113 g)
1.67 mg (139% DV)0.473 mg (39% DV)1.89 mg (157% DV)

7. Flax Seeds

Flax seeds are tiny but mighty powerhouses packed with nutrition. A mere ounce serving of these seeds can provide you with a multitude of health benefits.

These little wonders are rich in fiber, protein, essential fatty acids, and a range of B vitamins, including folate and thiamin.

With 39% of the daily value of thiamin in just one ounce, flax seeds are a nutritional treasure that can easily be incorporated into your diet.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 oz (28g) serving
1.64 mg (137% DV)0.473 mg (39% DV)

8. Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds are a nutrient-rich seed that offers a significant amount of thiamin.

Consuming just one ounce serving of sunflower seeds provides 35% of the daily value for thiamin.

Including sunflower seeds in your diet can be an excellent way to boost your thiamin intake.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 oz (28g) servingThiamin per 1 cup (140 g)
1.48 mg (123% DV)0.473 mg (39% DV)2.07 mg (172% DV)

9. Hemp Seeds

Hemp seeds have gained popularity due to their nutritional value.

They are rich in thiamin and are considered one of the best sources of niacin.

In fact, a single ounce serving of hemp seeds provides 30% of the recommended daily value for thiamin.

As more people discover the benefits of hemp seeds, their demand continues to rise.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 oz (28g) serving
1.28 mg (107% DV)0.36 mg (30% DV)

10. Pine Nuts

Pine nuts, though not as renowned as other nuts, are delectable and widely used in the popular pesto sauce.

These nuts not only offer delightful flavor but are also nutritionally beneficial. With their high thiamin content, they provide a remarkable 29% of the recommended daily value.

Despite their lesser-known status, pine nuts are a delightful addition to any dish and contribute to a well-rounded diet.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 oz (28g) serving
1.24 mg (103% DV)0.35 mg (30% DV)

11. Pistachio Nuts

Pistachio nuts, deemed by many as one of the most delicious nuts, are also packed with essential nutrients.

These nutrient powerhouses contain thiamin, providing an impressive 16% of the recommended daily value in just one ounce.

With their enticing flavor and high nutritional content, pistachios offer a delightful and healthful snacking option for those seeking a tasty treat with added benefits.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 oz (28g) serving
0.674 mg (56% DV)0.19 mg (16% DV)

12. Wheat Bran

Wheat Bran is the outer layer of the wheat kernel, packed with fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

It is a great source of B vitamins, providing 25% of the daily value for thiamin in just one cup.

This nutrient-rich ingredient is an excellent addition to a balanced diet, promoting digestive health and overall well-being.

Incorporating wheat bran into your meals is a simple way to boost your fiber intake and enjoy its many nutritional benefits.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 cup (58g) serving
0.523 mg (44% DV)0.303 mg (25% DV)

13. Rye Bread

Rye Bread is a type of bread that is made using rye flour instead of white flour. It is known for its distinct flavor and dense texture.

One of the key advantages of rye bread is its high nutrient content. Compared to regular bread made with white flour, rye bread is more nutrient-dense.

A two-slice serving of rye bread provides almost a quarter of the daily value for thiamin, accounting for 23% of the recommended intake.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 2-slice (64g) serving
0.434 mg (36% DV)0.278 mg (23% DV)

14. Bagel (Whole Wheat)

Bagel (Whole Wheat) is a delicious and nutritious choice for breakfast or a snack. Made from genuine whole wheat, it offers a higher nutrient content compared to regular bread.

Similar to rye bread, whole wheat bagels are rich in essential nutrients.

Notably, a single serving of this delectable bagel provides an impressive 35% of the recommended daily value of thiamin.

Indulge in the goodness of whole wheat bagels and fuel your day with a wholesome start!

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 regular bagel (105g)
0.403 mg (34% DV)0.423 mg (35% DV)

15. Green Peas

Green peas, belonging to the legume family, boast a nutrient profile akin to their leguminous counterparts.

With just a cup serving, these vibrant veggies offer a whopping 33% of the daily value for thiamin.

Packed with essential vitamins and minerals, green peas make for a healthy addition to any diet.

So, why not savor their delightful taste while reaping their nutritional benefits?

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 cup (160g) serving
0.249 mg (21% DV)0.398 mg (33% DV)

See Also: Top 13 Health Benefits of Green Peas!

16. Black Beans

Black beans are a thiamin-rich legume that offers numerous health benefits.

A single cup serving of cooked black beans provides 35% of the recommended daily value.

These beans are not only a great source of thiamin but also contain fiber, protein, and essential minerals.

Incorporating black beans into your diet can support heart health, regulate blood sugar levels, and promote digestive health.

Their versatile nature makes them a popular ingredient in various cuisines worldwide.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 cup (172g) serving
0.244 mg (20% DV)0.42 mg (35% DV)

Also-Read: Top 7 Natural Blood Thinners For Better Cardiovascular Health

17. Navy Beans

Navy beans are small white legumes with a high nutritional content.

Just one cup of cooked navy beans provides a significant amount of thiamin, offering 36% of the recommended daily value.

These beans are a healthy addition to any diet, as they are nutrient-dense and can contribute to overall well-being.

Enjoy the benefits of navy beans by incorporating them into your meals for a delicious and nutritious boost.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 cup (182g) serving
0.237 mg (20% DV)0.431 mg (36% DV)

18. Black Turtle Beans

Black turtle beans are a distinct type of legume, often mistaken for black beans. Despite their similar appearance, they have unique characteristics.

Notably, black turtle beans share a high thiamin content with black beans.

Consuming one cup of cooked black turtle beans fulfills 35% of the recommended daily value of thiamin.

This nutrient-rich legume offers an alternative to black beans and can be a valuable addition to a balanced diet.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 cup (185g) serving
0.225 mg (19% DV)0.416 mg (35% DV)

19. Edamame

Edamame, also known as fresh, immature soybeans, is widely considered a vegetable.

In just a cup serving, cooked edamame provides a significant nutritional boost, offering 25% of the daily value for thiamin.

These vibrant green beans are not only delicious but also packed with essential vitamins and minerals.

Whether enjoyed as a snack or incorporated into various recipes, edamame is a nutritious and versatile addition to any meal.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 cup (160g) serving
0.184 mg (15% DV)0.294 mg (25% DV)

20. Long-Grain Brown Rice

Long-Grain Brown Rice is a nutritious alternative to white rice, as it retains its rice bran, providing a wider array of nutrients.

This variety of rice is particularly rich in thiamin, making it an excellent source of this essential vitamin.

A single cup serving of cooked long-grain brown rice meets 29% of the recommended daily value of thiamin, making it a healthy choice for those looking to incorporate more nutrients into their diet.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 cup, cooked (195 g)
0.170 mg (14% DV)0.345 mg (29% DV)

21. Lentils

Lentils are a type of legume known for their nutritional benefits. They are rich in B vitamins, including thiamin.

Just a cup of cooked lentils provides 28% of the daily value for thiamin, making them a great source of this essential nutrient.

Lentils offer a balanced mix of B vitamins, which are important for various bodily functions.

Incorporating lentils into your diet can help ensure you meet your daily thiamin needs.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 cup (198g) serving
0.169 mg (14% DV)0.335 mg (29% DV)

22. Acorn Squash

Acorn Squash is a delicious winter squash variety with vibrant orange flesh.

This popular vegetable is not only flavorful but also packed with essential nutrients.

It is particularly abundant in thiamin, a vital vitamin for our health.

Just one cup of cooked acorn squash provides an impressive 29% of the recommended daily value for this essential nutrient.

Enjoy the sweet and nutty taste of acorn squash while reaping its numerous nutritional benefits.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 cup (205g) serving
0.167 mg (14% DV)0.342 mg (29% DV)

23. Asparagus

Asparagus, the epitome of deliciousness, is a remarkable vegetable packed with nutrition.

Its vibrant green color and satisfying taste make it a favorite among many.

Not only does it tantalize the taste buds, but it also offers great nutritional value.

A single cup serving of cooked asparagus provides an impressive 24% of the daily value of thiamin, making it one of the best vegetable sources for this essential nutrient.

Indulge in this mouthwatering veggie for a delightful and healthy culinary experience.

Thiamin per 100 gramsThiamin per 1 cup (180g) serving
0.162 mg (14% DV)0.292 mg (24% DV)

(Also, make sure to take a look at this: Is it beneficial for your health to consume asparagus on a daily basis?)

A Note From DailyTipsHealth.com

The nutritional values for each food in this guide were obtained from the USDA’s FoodData Central Database.

The daily values for thiamin in each food were determined by using these values along with the FDA’s most recent published daily values.

(Make sure to check out the list of 30 foods that are rich in Vitamin A.)

Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for Thiamin

According to the FDA’s published daily values, the ‘daily value’ for thiamin is 1.2 mg.

Like other vitamins and minerals, these quantities differ based on age, gender, and whether one is pregnant or breastfeeding.

Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for Thiamin
RDA of Thiamin

Measurement Methods of Vitamin B1 Intake

To track your Vitamin B1 or Thiamin intake, there are a few approaches you can follow.

Primarily, you can monitor your daily diet, keeping eye on foods rich in Thiamin.

Using smartphone apps to record your dietary intake is a handy method.

Many apps, like *MyFitnessPal*, allow you log your food and calculate nutrient intake for you.

Comprehensive food databases help you understand the nutritional breakdown of various foods, including Thiamin content.

Reading food labels is another method. Product packaging typically contains nutritional values. Keep an eye out for Thiamin or Vitamin B1 contents on labels.

In certain circumstances, your healthcare provider may suggest blood tests to measure Thiamin levels.

However, this isn’t typical unless deficiency symptoms present or there is a medical need.

Signs and Symptoms of Thiamine Deficiency

Thiamine, also known as vitamin B1, plays a crucial role in energy metabolism and the functioning of the nervous system.

A deficiency in thiamine can lead to several health issues, particularly affecting the cardiovascular and neurological systems.

Below are common signs and symptoms associated with thiamine deficiency:

Neurological Symptoms

Beriberi: A disease caused by thiamine deficiency that comes in two forms:

  1. Wet Beriberi: Affects the cardiovascular system, leading to heart failure and edema.
  2. Dry Beriberi: Impacts the nervous system, resulting in muscle weakness and eventual paralysis if left untreated.

Wernicke’s Encephalopathy: A severe and acute neurological disorder characterized by:

  1. Confusion or altered mental state
  2. Ataxia (lack of muscle coordination)
  3. Ophthalmoplegia (eye movement abnormalities)

Korsakoff Syndrome: A chronic memory disorder often associated with alcohol abuse, characterized by:

  1. Memory loss
  2. Confabulation (making up stories)
  3. Difficulty with learning new information

Cardiovascular Symptoms

  • Tachycardia (rapid heartbeat)
  • Shortness of breath
  • Swelling of the lower legs

Gastrointestinal Symptoms

  • Nausea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Constipation

Muscular Symptoms

  • Muscle weakness
  • Reduced muscle mass
  • Pain and tenderness

General Symptoms

  • Fatigue
  • Anorexia or weight loss
  • Peripheral neuropathy (tingling or numbness in the extremities)

Risk Factors of Thiamine Deficiency

Certain conditions and lifestyles can increase the risk of thiamine deficiency, including:

  • Chronic alcoholism
  • Malnutrition
  • Bariatric surgery
  • Chronic vomiting or diarrhea
  • Diseases like HIV/AIDS or diabetes

Diagnosis and Treatment Of Thiamine Deficiency

Thiamine deficiency is diagnosed through clinical assessment, dietary history, and sometimes blood tests to measure thiamine levels.

Treatment involves thiamine supplementation, either orally or through injections, and addressing the underlying cause of the deficiency.

Prompt treatment is essential to prevent irreversible damage, particularly to the brain and nervous system.

Therefore, anyone experiencing symptoms of thiamine deficiency should seek medical attention.

Prevention Of Thiamine Deficiency

Preventative measures include:

  • A balanced diet with thiamine-rich foods such as whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds
  • Thiamine supplementation when necessary
  • Reducing alcohol consumption
  • Regular medical check-ups for individuals with risk factors

Recognizing the signs and symptoms of thiamine deficiency is key to early diagnosis and effective treatment, thereby avoiding the potential for serious and long-term health complications.

Summary

In Summary, incorporating foods high in Vitamin B1 or Thiamin into your diet is essential for maintaining good health.

Foods like fish, seeds, nuts, bread, green peas, squash and others on the list are not just rich in Thiamin but also offer various other nutrients which synergize with Thiamin to enhance its health benefits.

Including these foods can facilitate better nerve function, positively impact your metabolism, strengthen your immune system and keep diseases at bay.

Whether you are a meat-lover, vegetarian, or vegan, you can find ample options in this list to help meet your daily Thiamin needs.

Having a varied diet and preferring whole foods over processed ones will significantly improve your Thiamin intake and overall wellness.

Last but not least, one should consult a healthcare professional or nutritionist for personalized dietary advice.

“Include thiamin-rich foods in your diet for optimal metabolism and cognitive health.”

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Infographic: What Can Vitamin A Do for Your Health, and How Does the B-Complex Boost Your Well-Being?

vitamin a and vitamin b complex
vitamin a and vitamin b complex

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

  1. What foods are rich in Vitamin B1?

Foods like pork, oranges, eggs, seeds, nuts, and legumes are high in Vitamin B1. It is also widely found in whole grains and fortified grain products like cereals and bread.

  1. Is Vitamin B1 found in meat?

Yes, certain types of meat such as pork and beef are good sources of Vitamin B1. Organ meats like liver are also rich in this vitamin.

  1. Are there plant-based sources of Vitamin B1?

Absolutely. Plant-based sources of Vitamin B1 include whole grains, legumes, seeds, and nuts. Even some vegetables and fruits, like asparagus and oranges, contain modest amounts of this vitamin.

  1. Can I get Vitamin B1 from dairy products?

Dairy products generally contain lower amounts of Vitamin B1. However, some enriched dairy products might have added vitamins, including B1.

  1. Are there any fortified sources of Vitamin B1?

Many cereal grains, bread, and pasta products are fortified with Vitamin B1, meaning the vitamin has been added to these foods during processing.

  1. Should I take a supplement for Vitamin B1?

For a healthy individual, a balanced diet should provide the necessary amount of Vitamin B1. However, in some circumstances, such as a medically diagnosed deficiency or certain health conditions, a healthcare provider might recommend Vitamin B1 supplements.

  1. Can cooking destroy Vitamin B1 in food?

Vitamin B1 is sensitive to heat and can be partially destroyed during cooking. Cooking methods that use less water such as steaming or microwaving can help preserve this vitamin.

  1. What are the health benefits of Vitamin B1?

Vitamin B1, also known as thiamine, plays a crucial role in maintaining a healthy nervous system. It also plays a vital role in energy metabolism.

  1. Are there any risks associated with Vitamin B1 deficiency?

Lack of enough Vitamin B1 can lead to conditions like Beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. The symptoms can include fatigue, confusion, and short-term memory loss.

  1. How much Vitamin B1 should I consume daily?

The recommended daily amount of Vitamin B1 varies with age, sex, and life stage. Normally, adults should aim for 1.1mg -1.2mg per day. Always consult with a healthcare professional for individualized advice.

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